Judging

JUDGING CRITERIA

 

Visual Impact

A successful entry is visually striking.

 

Technical Skill

A successful entry includes typical astrophotography criteria which, depending on the type of imaging employed, may include: Focus, dynamic range, tracking accuracy, appropriate exposure, etc.

 

Originality/Creativity

A successful entry uses unique settings or methods to present/display the image. It has an individual vitality and energy and creates a novel presentation.

 


 

JUDGING ROUNDS

 

Preliminary

  • Qualifying entries (those that meet eligibility criteria and abide by all competition rules) are scored by a panel of judges, consisting of scientists, engineers, astrophotographers, and other professionals from NSF.
  • All entries are scored anonymously.

 

Semifinal

  • Entries scored in the top half of each category in the preliminary round advance to the semifinal round. 
  • Entries are scored by a panel of judges, consisting of scientists, engineers, astrophotographers, and other professionals from NSF and Astronomy magazine.
  • All entries are scored anonymously.

 

Final

  • The top 10% or top 30 entries (whichever is smaller) of each category from the semifinal round advance to the final round.
  • Entries that reach the final round are eligible to win the People’s Choice award via an online public vote.
  • Entries are scored by a panel of distinguished judges, composed of prominent astronomers and scientific visualization artists, who are chosen jointly by NSF, Astronomy magazine, and Discover magazine.
  • Each entry is scored by all of the final-round judges.
  • All entries are scored anonymously.
  • Judges, at their discretion, may choose not to award First or Second prize in a category, but may instead choose to award Honorable Mentions or choose not to award a prize at all.
  • All judges’ decisions are final.
  • Winners will be notified individually before the public announcement of the official contest results. Failure to reach winners will not delay the public announcement. Contest results will be publicly announced in Astronomy magazine, on Astronomy.com, on DiscoverMagazine.com, and by a joint news release with NSF. NSF will also publish the names of winners on its website. By participating in this contest, you give implicit permission to NSF, Astronomy magazine and Discover magazine to publish your names and images of Comet ISON.
  • Entire contest is subject to cancellation should the visibility of the comet be judged not optimal by scientific staff at NSF, Astronomy magazine and Discover magazine.
ADVERTISEMENT

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Collapse bottom bar
DSCOctCover
+

Log in to your account

X
Email address:
Password:
Remember me
Forgot your password?
No problem. Click here to have it emailed to you.

Not registered yet?

Register now for FREE. It takes only a few seconds to complete. Register now »