Science, Interrupted

War and strife have uprooted many researchers. Can their life’s work be saved?

RELATED TAGS: SCIENCE POLICY
science-interrupted
Eqbal Dauqan was excited. She had just completed her postdoctoral fellowship and was leading the new therapeutic nutrition department she’d lobbied to create at Yemen’s Al-Saeed University. Then the bombs started dropping. “Everything was damaged, our university, our home. My family had to move to a rental apartment outside the center of the city, where people were fighting and killing each other,” says Dauqan, 37, a biochemist from Ta‘izz. The city, near the Red S...
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