Table of Contents May 2017

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We celebrate the heroes who propelled science forward, the communicators who brought science to the public, the families who kept science going for decades and the forgotten researchers whose work lives on. The flowers in your garden brighter than you think, and it has nothing to do with the color of their petals. Plants are actually pretty smart, and scientists are learning why. Researchers have notched few victories in fight against pancreatic cancer, but a revolutionary new method using the body's own immune system may tip the scales in scientists' favor.

Plus: The war over (quantum) reality, and the last of Easter Island's endemic species cling to survival. All this and more in our heroic May issue.
Digital editions

FEATURES

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Quantum physics may be well understood, but scientists still don’t agree on what it means.
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Here's to the household names and forgotten figures who accomplished incredible feats of knowledge — no capes required.
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Some scientists never got the praise they deserved. Here's to the ones history passed over.
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You know the units, but do you recognize the scientists responsible for them?
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The auto industry had the Fords, oil had the Rockefellers, and politics had the Kennedys. Science, too, has its legacy lineages.
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They learn. They remember. They make decisions.

DEPARTMENTS

caring-machines
Artificial intelligence is learning right from wrong by studying human stories and moral principles.
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A marathoner completes a race through the Borneo rainforest, then pays the price with a deadly ailment.
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A few native species still survive in remote caves and along cliff sides.
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Today’s depictions of agile, often feathered animals are a far cry from the saggy tail-draggers of yesteryear. How did early research get it so wrong?
evasion
Pancreatic cancer is notoriously difficult to treat, but researchers’ latest immunotherapy tactics may give them the upper hand.
earthquakedamage
Even though technology has helped measure strength and flag strike zones, earthquakes still have a few mysteries that rattle experts.

THE CRUX

The sun could create chaos by way of its coronal mass.
The impact of clean-burning stoves on global health.
A researcher’s first excursion to the bottom of the ocean leaves a lasting impression.
"The Smith and the Devil" progressed from proto-languages to all of the modern languages.
Past promises of lab meat were overly optimistic.
The tools researchers use to track their scaly subjects.
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