That Word You Heard: Superhydrophobic

It's the key to getting every last drop.

RELATED TAGS: MATERIALS SCIENCE
DSC-CR0417_08
Though it might tempt you to break out into a Mary Poppins song, superhydrophobic has nothing to do with dancing penguins or carousels come to life. The term refers to a material’s ability to repel water. When water droplets hit surfaces with this property, they don’t flatten like they normally would — they bead up, often contacting the surface at angles exceeding 150 degrees, and roll off. You can see this phenomenon in nature when water falls onto a lotus leaf. Outside of nat...
DSC-CV0517web

The full text of this article is available to Discover Magazine subscribers only.

Subscribe and get 10 issues packed with:
  • The latest news, theories and developments in the world of science
  • Compelling stories and breakthroughs in health, medicine and the mind
  • Environmental issues and their relevance to daily life
  • Cutting-edge technology and its impact on our future
Already a subscriber? Register now!
Registration is FREE and takes only a few seconds to complete. If you are already registered on DiscoverMagazine.com, please log in.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
DSC-CV0517web
+