Table of Contents September 2016

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Earth has endured its fair share of extinctions over the past 4 billion years. They aren't freak accidents, and the culprit is somewhere in space. But do mass extinctions work like clockwork?In Turkey, archaeologists are uncovering evidence a Neolithic, egalitarian utopia. How did it all fall apart?

You'll also see how new technology is giving us fair warning for impending natural disasters, and how pioneering research is granting women diagnosed with cancer new opportunities to become mothers. Plus, we dive into a mustachioed medical mystery, primordial gravity waves and the science of taking risks.

Digital editions

FEATURES

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Do big extinctions come like clockwork — from space?
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Turkey’s Neolithic city of Çatalhöyük may have been an orderly society built on tolerance and equality — until it fell apart.
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Teens tend to make rash decisions, and it all comes down to the brain. Adults could learn a thing or two from them.
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Advances in natural hazard forecasting could help keep more people out of harm’s way.
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Young women diagnosed with cancer face yet another challenge: infertility. Experimental research could restore their opportunity to start a family.

DEPARTMENTS

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Channeling Sherlock Holmes, an attending physician unravels a hairy situation.
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Lessons from a boomer on the frontlines.
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Once again, astronomers may be close to unraveling one of the universe’s oldest mysteries. And this time, they’ve learned from their mistakes.
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In vino veritas, as the popular Latin saying goes. And we’ve got 20 truths of our own about that liquid grape goodness.

THE CRUX

Life hangs on outside the International Space Station.
Should psychology researchers focus more on confirming old results and less on new discoveries?
New research reveals more roadblocks for Tasmania’s iconic animal.
A small favor turns into a fortuitous discovery.
Using crop leftovers to make plastic without a carbon footprint.
Tyrannosaurs, power grids and the science of profanity are among the titles in this month's reading list.
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