Table of Contents October 2016

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Live long and prosper, as the Vulcan salute goes. Some people have managed that first part much better than others, and the key could be in their DNA. See how our elders are revealing the mechanics of aging. MIT Neuroscientist, and wicked bassist, Earl Miller wants to change the way we think about working memory — and make us all smarter.

Take a trip to Chicxulub, where researchers are getting a closer look at one of Earth's most cataclysmic extinction events, and behold the power in weapons of math destruction. Also in this issue, you'll find out how researchers are relying on the Judas fish, and catch-up on the latest in the hunt for Planet 9. You're not getting any younger, so dive in!

Digital editions

FEATURES

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The secrets to staying young may lie in the DNA of the oldest among us.
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MIT neuroscientist Earl Miller has changed the way we think about working memory — the brain’s scratchpad.
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Credit scores are one of the formulas that determine our world. They often work against us, from job prospects to how long we’re on hold.
doomsday
An expedition in the Gulf of Mexico gets to the core of the most important event in the past 100 million years.

DEPARTMENTS

20-things-bats
Forget your stereotypes. There’s more to these winged mammals of the dark than vampire lore.
lake-trout
In Montana’s glacial lakes, biologists deploy an unusual weapon to defend native bull trout against an invader.
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An unprecedented view of one person’s brain function over many months could unlock new therapies.
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How our body can influence our mind.
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Doctors can now tailor cancer treatments based on their patients’ genes, but expansion will require new levels of data sharing and computing power.
plague
We still have much to learn — and fear — from the ancient pestilence.
planet-9
Our familiar solar system still hides some of the universe's biggest mysteries.

THE CRUX

All aboard, scientists studying climate change.
Birds give up on migrating and gorge on garbage instead.
Force is strong with this one.
New tech makes bioprinting more efficient.
Total eclipses, trees' lives and a "doomsday vault" are among our picks this month.
Does recent research bring us any closer to understanding it?
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