Table of Contents June 2016

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Einstein’s creative thinking rewrote the rulebook for the universe. Take a closer look at some of his most mind-boggling thought experiments. Psychologist Robert Hare has come face-to-face with the most notorious criminals. Join him on a journey through the mind of a psychopath.

The San Francisco Bay Area is the stage for another high-tech battle, but it’s not between web-based startups. You’ll see how the gene-editing technique Crispr-Cas9 is sparking rivalries and empowering DIY users in Silicon Valley. The hunt for gravitational waves is headed underground, and the best is yet to come for string theory. There’s a lot more science to stimulate your curiosity in the June issue of Discover.
Digital editions

FEATURES

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How Einstein’s creative thinking led to a new rulebook for the universe.
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With just time, talent and their own gear, citizen astrophotographers create brilliant and innovative images.
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In the San Francisco Bay Area, from global corporations to kids, everyone is embracing the breakthrough gene-editing technology CRISPR.
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Fifty years ago, his chilling experiences as a prison psychologist led Robert Hare on a lifelong quest to understand one of humanity’s most fascinating — and dangerous — disorders.

DEPARTMENTS

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While the novel theory may never live up to the early hype, its innovative tools have helped scientists for decades, and the best may be yet to come.
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A recovering addict suffers from extreme nausea and stomach cramps. But the most obvious explanation may not be the right one.
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A long-forgotten collection of glass sea creatures resurfaces, to the delight — and alarm — of biologists.
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Sailships may offer our best shot at reaching the edge of the solar system and beyond.
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Israeli cave finds challenge our theories about evolution’s winners and losers.
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Cryoconite holes in the world’s glaciers harbor miniature environments that could vanish as the slabs melt away.
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They’re itchy, bumpy and sometimes lethal. And most of the critters gifting you with those lovely bites aren’t even technically bugs.

THE CRUX

Japanese researchers go underground to detect gravitational waves.
Sometimes spacecraft go above and beyond their primary duties.
Insoles that could improve balance in seniors are inching closer to market.
Millions of nerve fibers connect the hemispheres of the cerebrum.
Smart summer reads for 2016 cover rattlesnakes, bees and a fish called arowana.
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