Table of Contents July/August 2016

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Special Issue: Everything Worth Knowing

The human thirst for knowledge is a mighty thing. From researchers who devote their lives to science, to you, our readers, learning how the world works is a never-ending quest. We’ve boiled down the infinite expanse of knowledge to 15 hot areas of science, and spelled out everything worth knowing about each.

Plus, learn how Hubble Deep Field changed astronomy, and take a trip back in time to see how the dangers of early train travel sparked a medical specialty that’s left its mark. We’re also introducing a new medical science column, called Prognosis, in this special issue of Discover. So forge ahead and get the rundown on dinosaurs, black holes, stem cells, microbiomes, entanglement, medical imaging and more.

Digital editions

FEATURES

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In this special issue of Discover, we dive into the hottest topics in science, and boil them down to the essentials.
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Amnesiacs, memory champions and rats, oh my!
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Don’t let these ailments keep you up at night.
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Superheroes of the cellular world.
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How many cities will our oceans swallow?
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The “spooky action” really exists.
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Invisible worlds, ultimate partners.
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Getting inside your head (and other parts).
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How to identify one in the wild. (Hey, it could happen.)

DEPARTMENTS

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What exactly is chronic traumatic encephalopathy?
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Why do we get so much pleasure from satin sheets or a cashmere blanket?
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How a 19th-century medical specialty added to our knowledge, saved lives — and vanished from the face of the Earth.
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The thought of swimming with them might scare you, but there’s more to these deep-sea predators than meets the eye.
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Some strange geology pops up in Michigan.
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The universe's biggest blasts take on a new dimension.

THE CRUX

If what we see out there is old, how can we know what the cosmos looks like right now?
Flytraps count down to chow time.
Scientists disagree about how long our planet has sported the magnetic armor that makes it habitable.
Established dating technique offers a new look into endangered species.
Tech, war, coyotes, what's going on in our head and more.
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