Table of Contents November 2013

November-2013-cover

Find out all you need to know about this year's most anticipated cosmic event, Comet ISON. Whether it flares or fizzles, this is one show you won't want to miss.

Read about the therapy that helps patients overcome OCD and how politics are putting pachyderms in peril. Also in this issue: the science of sex ratios in future generations, the real trick to successful negotiations, and the disease that makes people allergic to the most common chemicals in everyday life.

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FEATURES

ison

The most anticipated astronomical event of 2013 is a tale of self-destruction more than 4 billion years in the making.

DSC-E1113_06Anemone

A researcher turns activist when violence and political chaos in the Central African Republic put the elephants she studies — and her life's work — in peril.

TILT-opener

Its sufferers were once dismissed as hypochondriacs, but there's growing biological evidence to explain toxicant-induced loss of tolerance (TILT).

JeffreySchwartz_2139

A groundbreaking therapy, relying on mindfulness meditation to treat obsessive compulsive disorder, suggests even adult brains have neuroplasticity.

DEPARTMENTS

gender-ratios

Social factors can’t explain shifts in human gender ratios. It’s time to ask evolutionary biologists for help.

pool-player

A doctor resorts to unconventional methods to find out what's wrong with her stumbling but sober friend.

negotiation-impasse

Surprisingly, the more two negotiators match each other's language styles, the worse things are likely to go.

logging

Guyana's tropical rainforests protected under the REDD program provide not just natural resources but an income stream to the country.

bugs-on-sticks

Get the skinny on why tummies rumble and how we might feed the world.

THE CRUX

An engineering feat aims to prevent the canals from destroying the city they made famous.

The half-blimp half-jet saves fuel and requires no transportation infrastructure.

One day you may be able to recharge your phone by plugging it into your clothes.

Future electronics may look like origami projects.

Flexibility, balance and muscle strength are key indicators of longevity.

A marine biologist recalls a jarring underwater confrontation.

Saturn's moon features a river of liquid methane called the Vid Flumina.

HOT SCIENCE

Urbanaction

This month's entertainment features robotic police reinforcements, balloons of the past and smart cities of the future.

robot-classroom

Inexpensive (and cute!) machines can work wonders as teaching tools. 

shutterstock_116458489

Experience an earthquake simulator, an African hybrid eclipse and kinetic art this month.

mastodon-display

Check out an ancient mastodon and the inside of the human body.

enders-game

How the Hollywood writer and director brings invisible internal conflicts to the silver screen.

DSC-HS1113-300dpi

Will the comet be a blazing dagger in the daylight, or a faint flicker in the night sky?

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