Just Call Me Egghead

The surprising smarts of crows and jays are forcing scientists to reconsider how they define intelligence.

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Nicky Clayton is no better at sitting still than are the birds she studies. Back in the 1990s, her colleagues at the University of California, Davis, would stay at their computers at lunchtime, but she would wander outside and watch as western scrub-jays stole bits of students’ meals and secretively cached the food. During these informal field studies, Clayton, an experimental psychologist, noticed that the birds returned frequently to their stashes and changed their hiding places. “...
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