Bogglers

By Scott Kim|Tuesday, July 01, 2003

Words for the Wise

Phraseology
[Easy to challenging] These word pictures represent common phrases or terms used in science. The first, for example, means "half-life." You'll need to think "inside the box" to decode the others.





Connect the Letters
[Easy] The set of simple words listed below has an unusual property: Any two words share exactly one letter. For instance, ado and ore share the letter o, and ado and bed share the letter d. There is a seventh word that completes the set. What is it? Note that rob, for example, would not be a valid solution because it shares two of its letters with words already on the list (boy and ore). And roe would not be a valid solution, as it shares all three letters with a word already on the list (ore). Hint: The diagram below can help.
1. ADO BOY
ORE YEA
BAR BED
__ __ __


[Challenging] Fill in the missing words in the four sets below. Hint: Every letter occurs the same number of times within each complete set; words in sets 4 and 5 share more than one letter. You can use the triangular diagram for sets 2 and 3.

2. POT HOE
TIE ION
NTH PEN
__ __ __


3. TOE STY
USE YOU
YEN
__ __ __
__ __ __


4. RATES CARTS
CASTE CARES
CRATE
__ __ __ __ __


5. NAIL IDEA
SALE SLID
SINE SAND
__ __ __ __





Powers of Ten
[Easy to challenging] Science and technology often deal with very big or very small numbers. These days computer hard drives, for example, typically hold several billion bytes, or gigabytes, of binary-coded information. One billion is represented in scientific notation by 109, which stands for 10 multiplied by itself nine times, or 1 followed by nine zeros. Going in the opposite direction, the size of an atom is measured in picometers, or trillionths of a meter. One-trillionth of a meter is written as 10-12; the minus sign in front of the exponent 12 means 10 is multiplied by itself 12 times but divided into 1, yielding the unwieldy fraction 1/1,000,000,000,000. In the matching game below, try to pair up each of these 12 metric prefixes with its correct power of 10. (This should be a simple task for scientists and for our foreign readers, but it may be daunting for metrically challenged Americans.)





Solution

Want to see the solution to this puzzle?



Let us know what you think of Bogglers: E-mail alternate solutions, comments, and suggestions to bogglers@discover.com.



Got new solutions for the puzzle? Want to see other people's solutions? Talk to the puzzle master in his discussion forum at www.scottkim.com.



There are more puzzles and inventions by Scott Kim on his Web site, www.scottkim.com, where you will also find an archive of his monthly Bogglers columns, a Bogglers discussion board, and other amusements for your mind.



© Copyright 2003 The Walt Disney
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