Table of Contents April 1992

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Discover Magazine's mission is to enable readers to lead richer lives by explaining and expanding their universe.  Each month we bring you in depth information and analysis from various topics ranging from technology and space to the living world we live in.
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FEATURES

Derek Bickerton plans to isolate little kids before they've learned any language to see if they'll invent one.
Astronomers have looked long and hard for planets outside the solar system. At last their search may have paid off.
A Texas cardiologist goes into Orbit with 29 rats, 2,478 jellyfish, and a plastic tube snaking through his veins to the entrance of his pounding heart.
Blow up a balloon very, very fast, or zip around a pair of cosmic strings, and you're on your way.
Where is it written in stone that the man should have all the fun? In some species of animals, evolution has made females the polygamists.
Sleeping with babies could ward off sudden infant death syndrome.
The mice in Suzanne Ilstad's lab are not quite themselves--there's a little rat in them, and therein may lie the secret to human organ transplants.

DATA

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, many worried that the republics wouldn’t be able to keep control over the weapons they had inherited.
Read about a team studying how the sun interacts with Earth’s magnetic field and the particles trapped in it, and how this type of interaction produces the northern and southern lights.
How do you build a speaker equipped with both better sound and adjustable sound?
Every doctor has a condition he or she hates treating, and for me impalement is it.
In the biological world, the ability to produce or perceive infrasound has been considered a rarity.
Some of the vanished water from Lake Chad may still be available for use.

Are aircrafts with flapping wings in our future?

The smuggling operation adds a whole new dimension to ways that creatures can evolve.
Find out if you suffer from topographical amnesia.
The Dipper reaches its annual apex in spring.
Researchers are just beginning to understand how hardy roaches really are.
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